The Motivating Factors of a Long Life

Type “ways to prolong life” into Google, and you will get about two and a half million results.  Most of the sites include ways to maintain a balanced diet, develop a healthy exercise regiment, and a long list of things to enjoy in moderation in life coupled with a list of things to avoid altogether.  In the past hundred years, science and medicine has successfully figured out ways to extend the average lifespan from 49 to 78 years, and the expectation is that we will figure out ways to extend well beyond that number in the next fifty or so years.  The emphasis in our society for life extension has been a major focus our entire lives, and all of us are looking to add some years onto our time on this earth.  The most valuable of all resources on the planet seems to be time.  Yet, this week the world learned of Mbah Gotho from Indonesia who professes to be 145 years old, according to his government’s verification of his stories and documents.  If the idea is that more time equals more happiness, than Mbah must be pretty thrilled to have lived so long, right?  When asked what he now desires most in life, he said, “What I want is to die,” and apparently this desire has not been a recent one.  He purchased his gravesite in 1992, when he was 122 years old and visits it every day, but for the past 24 years, he has continued to live on despite the expectation that his death was supposed to be a long time ago.  According to reports, he has outlived all ten of his siblings, four of his wives, and all of his children, as well as experienced all of the horrors of the world from the past century and a half.  Although unable to see well, he can still hear and function reasonably well for a 145-year-old man, but he feels as if he “has been through it all” and wants to pass on.  So, given this extreme example of us who want to live longer, and Mr. Gotho who has lived too long, is there a happy medium that exists that reveals how long we should live in order to be happy?  Perhaps it’s not the length of life that we should be concerned with but instead the quality.  We seem to think that more time is the necessary variable to additional happiness, however, the key seems to be not how much time we have but how we spend our time.  Psalm 90.12 asks for God to “teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom,” for when we number our days, we then realize that time is precious, and that we should not spend time wasting time but instead living as if every day is our last: fulfilled days over longer ones.  Perhaps our reason for wanting to live as long as possible stems from a fear of death and a panic of the unknown.  The good news is that as Christians, there is nothing for us to fear as there is an assurance of heaven, but combined with the thought that maybe we’ve wasted a good portion of our lives, we tend to look for life prolongation as the answer.  Instead, let’s look to life enhancement and fulfillment through not only a daily renewal in Him, but also a purposeful life, one that seeks to make daily changes in the world and in people’s lives for the better.  When we embrace the idea of a finite existence on this earth, we acknowledge that someday we will die, thus freeing us of the burden of anxiety of our own demise.  Then, instead of spending our lives fearfully avoiding death, we spend it without fear and truly living.  Amen.

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